Thursday, May 23, 2013

FINAL DAYS - EVERYTHING MUST GO

Install It 3 runs only two more days. See it May 23 and 24 from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Thanks to everyone.

Friday, May 10, 2013

Take a tour of the tunnel – and the art Thursday evening




You can get an inside and underneath view of the exhibition with of Install It 3 – above and below with a free tour at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 16.
The installation art exhibition, on view through May 24, is located in the Vista Greenway/former train tunnel at the intersection of Lincoln and Lady streets. Artists Michaela Pilar Brown, Bri Kinard, Amanda Ladymon, Kara Gunter, Wendell George Brown and Kimberly Bookman have created works which respond to the history of Washington Street, a once-thriving African-American commercial and social district under which the tunnel runs, and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The artists have created works that include photography, wax, plaster, paper, earth and grass.
The tour will be given by exhibition curator Jeffrey Day, several of the participating artists, historian Ramon Jackson and community members.
The exhibition, sponsored by the Congaree Vista Guild and part of the annual art event Artista Vista, is open daily from dawn to dark.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Install It 3 - above and below explores hidden history of city

Welcome to the third year of Install It, the installation art component of Artista Vista. 
This year six artists have creating works located in and around the former train tunnel, now part of the Vista Greenway.  
The artists Michaela Pilar Brown, Amanda Ladymon, Bri Kinard, Kara Gunter, Wendell George Brown and Kimberly Bookman were asked to respond to Washington Street which was once a major a business and social street for the African-American community, home to the Zion Baptist Church, an African-American state fair, restaurants, funeral homes, a theater and the Richard Samuel Roberts photography studio and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement.

The tunnel runs directly beneath Washington Street and serves as an apt metaphor for the hidden history of the street above.
The artist did not make directly didactic pieces, but  explores ideas of overcoming challenges, breaking free of social and political confinement, how we are all connected and the ways we are connected. They worked in a variety of mediums: photography, plaster casting, natural materials, ceramics and even grass and tar and each piece was created specifically for this exhibition and space.
The tunnel is just north of the intersection of Lincoln and Lady streets and is open dawn to dark through May 24.  

Saturday, May 4, 2013

Some more recent activity in the tunnel

 Install it curator Jeffrey Day and artist Michaela Pilar Brown gave a tour of the exhibition to representative of Our Story Matter-The 1963 project charged with commemorating the Civil Rights Movement in Columbia. At right Day with Our Story Matters team member Dr. Bobby Donaldson, an Associate Professor of History at USC.

The Mayor's Famously Hot Bike Ride made a stop at the Vista Greenway to hear about Install It 3. That's Mayor Steve Benjamin with the fancy helmet.

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Friday, April 26, 2013

Come to the Tunnel for a tour - Saturday at 130 p.m.

Install it 3: above and below curator Jeffrey Day and the artists, Michaela Pilar Brown, Kimberly Bookman, Kara Gunter, Wendell George Brown, Amanda Ladymon and Bri Kinard, will give a talk and tour Saturday, April 27 at 1:30 p.m. 
Vista Greenway/former train tunnnel, Lincoln and Lady streets.





Thursday, April 25, 2013

Install It 3 - above and below opening at 5 today!


Come to the Vista Greenway (the former train tunnel near Lincoln and Lady streets) to see Install it 3: above and below that's part of the Artista Vista gallery crawl Thursday night from 5 - 9.



The exhibition will be on display until May 24 and the tunnel is open from dawn to dusk daily.
The curator Jeffrey Day and the artists, Michaela Pilar Brown, Kimberly Bookman, Kara Gunter, Wendell George Brown, Amanda Ladymon and Bri Kinard, will give a talk and tour Saturday, April 27 at 1:30 p.m.

Amanda Ladyman explores workers rights in Install It piece



Amanda Ladymon uses the human figure in her The Mill Struggle:
Unraveling the Southern Strategy  

This work addresses the emotional and physical aspects of struggle through the human figure and textiles. African-American and white women of the Carolinas fought restrictions barring African-Americans from working in textile mills. South Carolina was once a major center for textile production and indigo, used to dye blue jeans, was the first cash crop for the state. The blue jeans were all acquired in West Columbia where the majority of The Columbia Mill workers lived. The fabric symbolizes that connection with this historic time in the South.
Amanda Ladymon has exhibited at 701 Whaley and in Contemporaries Artist of the Year at the Columbia Museum of Art. She holds an MFA from USC, teaches at USC, Columbia College and Ladybug Studios and is exhibition coordinator for S & S Art Supply.




Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Installation process starts in the tunnel



Kimberly Bookman and Bri Kinard began working on
there works for Install It 3 Tuesday.



Reliquary: A True Likeness
of a Southern Family
by Bookman is a collaboration of sorts between the artist and the photographer Richard Samuel Roberts who in the early 20th century had a photography studio on Washington Street a few blocks from this tunnel. It includes pictures Roberts took of Columbia-area residents and photos of the artist’s family which has lived in the Swansea area for many generations. 





Kinard is using natural plants, tar and ceramics for herTar & Tokens which is a response to the surroundings: the tunnel in which it is located and neighborhood and especially the Blue Palace Tea Room, once located nearby.






Sunday, April 21, 2013

Install It 3: above and below just a few days away



Welcome to the third year of Install It, the installation art component of Artista Vista. 
This year six artists are creating works that will be located in and around the former train tunnel, now part of the Vista Greenway.  
The artists Michaela Pilar Brown, Amanda Ladymon, Bri Kinard, Kara Gunter, Wendell George Brown and Kimberly Bookman were asked to respond to Washington which was once a major a business and social street for the African-American community, home to the Zion Baptist Church, an African-American state fair, restaurants, funeral homes, a theater and the Richard Samuel Roberts photography studio and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement.
The tunnel runs directly beneath Washington Street and serves as an apt metaphor for the hidden history of the street above.
The artist will are not making directly didactic pieces, but are exploring ideas of overcoming challenges, breaking free of social and political confinement, how we are all connected and the ways we are connected. They are working in a variety of mediums: photography, plaster casting, natural materials, ceramics and even tar. The works are being made specifically for this exhibition and space. 
The exhibition opens April 25 in conjunction with the Artista Vista gallery crawl Thursday night from 5 - 9  p.m. and the artists and I will be there. A tour of the exhibition with the artist and curator will take place at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, April 27. The exhibition will be on display until MAY 24 and can be seen when the tunnel is open from dawn to dusk. Admission to the exhibition and all related events is free.  
Installation art was an important part of Artista Vista in its early years, but as the area developed space to do such work became more scarce. (When Artista Vista trains still ran through the middle of the Vista and through the tunnel; what’s now the Blue Marlin Restaurant was the Amtrak station.) The Vista Guild decided in 2011 to bring back an installation show for the 20th anniversary of Artista Vista. That exhibition, mostly held inside in a building on Gervais St., was a success and Install It was back for in 2012 with works located outdoors throughout the Vista which allowed the show to remain on display for a month and provide more public access. This year we hope to have brought together the best of those two by placing the works outdoors and easily accessible for a month and having all the works in one central location. 
We extend our thanks to the City of Columbia for allowing the use of the Vista Greenway.





Thursday, March 14, 2013

Install It back for 2013 Artista Vista



Install It – the installation art component of Artist Vista – will be back for 2013.
The 2013 exhibition taps into the history of the Washington Street area which was once a major a business and social street for the African-American community. The street was and is the home of many important places such as the Zion Baptist Church, an African-American state fair and the Richard Samuel Roberts photography studio. The exhibition will also tie into the Columbia 63 which is celebrating important milestones in the Civil Rights Movement as well as Mayor Steve Benjamin’s Famously Hot Bicycle Ride.
Most of the artworks will be installed in and around the former train tunnel that is now part of the Vista Greenway. The tunnel runs directly beneath Washington Street and serves as an apt metaphor for the hidden history of the street above.
Artists taking part are Michaela Pilar Brown, Amanda Ladymon, Bri Kinard, Kara Gunter and Wendell George Brown and Kimberly Bookman.
The exhibition will be on display until MAY 24
The exhibition that enlists Columbia artists to create non-traditional works for unusual locations was started in 2011 and continued in 2012. Installation art was an important part of Artista Vista when it was founded 22 years ago in the emerging arts district, but as the area rapidly redeveloped these art projects took a long hiatus.
Installation art exhibitions were restarted by the Congaree Vista Guild in 2011 as part of the 20th anniversary Artista Vista and dubbed Install It. Jeffrey Day, a long-time arts writer in Columbia, curated the 2011 and 2012 exhibitions and will also be putting together the 2013 exhibition.
The 2013 exhibition will also be outdoors where it can be seen by the greatest number of people and will be on display until May 24.